TMC17

I recently got back from Twitter Math Camp (TMC), and in the words of David Butler, “That was unreasonably awesome.”  Yes.  Yes it was.  I’m having a hard time putting into words what I’m feeling after this conference.  I feel I can’t adequately describe my experiences.  It is so unlike any other conference or PD I’ve attended.

Everyone was there to learn and grow.  Everyone.  As David Butler said, “Everyone is worthy to present.”  Whether you had written a book, a curriculum, were presenting, a veteran teacher, or a newbie.  We were all there to learn and grow from each other.  As Jonathan said in his recap, “Everyone gave a crap.”

Just to forewarn you this post contains a ton of pictures and a ton of links -so I can find everything later! 🙂

Desmos

On Wednesday I was able to spend the day learning from the Desmos staff.  I am looking forward to spending time playing around with some of the new features they shared with us.  Meeting Eli Luberoff, the founder of Desmos, was definitely a highlight for me.

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Morning Session

I attended the Rich Tasks morning session with Cal Armstrong, Peg Cagle, and Bill Thill.  It was sort of a spur of the moment decision to go to their session, but I’m so glad I did.  I have been wanting to implement more rich tasks into my classroom, but was unsure how to go about doing this.

Day One:  We were given the following task.  It is similar to Fawn Nguyen‘s Visual Patterns.  After we complied a list of all of our responses, we paired up with someone who wanted to look into the same thing and start playing with the problem.  Julie and I had a great conversation as we worked through the task.

I’m not sure yet how I would use something like this in my own classroom, but it was a lot of fun to be given so much freedom when working on this activity.

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Day Two: We watched a few videos of teachers from around the world teaching and discussed their teacher moves and the reasoning behind the tasks they were using with their students.  Peg said a couple of things that day that stood out to me.

  • “Focusing on your goals doesn’t please everyone, but we have to keep in mind why we’re doing what we’re doing.” -Peg Cagle
  • “You can’t build on your strengths if you don’t own them and recognize them.” -Peg Cagle

Day Three:  The last day of our time together they focused on how to take every day tasks and make them richer.  They shared with us several prompts that could be used with a worksheet that would result in a richer task and students thinking more deeply about the problems.

  • Which 3 problems would be hardest for you and which 3 would be easiest?  Why?
  • Which 3 problems do you think will be the most challenging to the most students in our class and why?
  • Which 3 problems do you think would be most useful to a student preparing for an assessment on this material and why?
  • Which problems will students make mistakes on and what will those mistakes be?

I LOVE these prompts!  One of the things I love about these prompts is that it will likely slow students down.  They will have to analyze the problems and almost start doing them in their head before they actually start working out the problems on paper.  Peg also shared the following, which gave me something to think about:  We typically put the easier questions at the beginning of an assignment.  Students work on those problems in class with their groups and then have the more challenging problems for homework.  What if we switched the order of the problems so that the students had the easier problems for homework?

Peg also shared this with us to close our time together, “Remember that there is no single right answer about which task to use or how to implement it.  The right answer is whatever best supports your students in making progress towards your identified mathematical learning goal.”

And lastly she shared this, “Good to Great:  Any change in our practice is likely to begin with a drop in productivity.  Expect that things will get worse before they get better.  Give yourself and your students time to re-acclimate.”

As I was thinking about this session, something hit me.  Implementing a new routine in my classroom is sort of like teaching new math concepts.  I wouldn’t just jump in and start teaching solving systems of linear equations by graphing to my students if we hadn’t done anything with graphing lines before.  When it comes to implementing more rich tasks in my classroom, I need to start smaller and build up so that my students can use their experience and skills working with the smaller rich tasks on the bigger ones.  So, my #1TMCthing is to incorporate more rich tasks into my classroom this year.  I plan to start by using some of the prompts given to us on the last day and see where things go from there.

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More Math

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  • I went to Annie Fetter‘s session titled “Sense Making:  Is it at the Core of Your Classrooms?”  (You can download Annie’s slideshow here.)
    • Math is really about relationships, but kids think it’s about numbers.
    • Ask about ideas, not answers.  “Tell me something about problem 7?” instead of “What is the answer to problem 7?” because everyone in the room can tell me something about problem 7, even if they don’t know the answer.
    • Ways to become a better listener:  Ask questions that you don’t know the answer to.
    • Annie was the second person to mention recording your teaching for 10 minute segments by putting your phone in your pocket and recording yourself.
  • I missed Norma Gordon‘s session on Smudged Math, but I plan on going through the resources she shared on the TMC Wiki.
  • I also missed Pam‘s session on asking good questions.  Her presentation is here.
  • Several of the “My Favorites” sessions that were shared were based on blog posts I had read by these people, but it’s always fun to hear them talk about it in person.
  • I loved Pam Wilson‘s Make a Difference Monday

Don’t let anyone tell you that you aren’t a great teacher.  Ever.  And don’t tell yourself that.  Ever.  -Lisa Henry & Sam Shah

People

When I went to TMC last year in Minneapolis, one of the things that stood out to me most was the relationships people at TMC had with each other.  It was SO evident that these people didn’t just see each other one week out of the year and that was it.  These people had formed true friendships with each other.  Because I hadn’t really been super active on Twitter prior to TMC last year, I didn’t really know anyone apart from a few MN teachers.  I remember shyly walking up to Casey on the last day of our morning session and asking if I she wanted me to sign her book.

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Shortly after TMC last year, I wrote this post, which prompted Casey to adopt me as her little sister.  She has been a constant source of encouragement and made me feel like I had something to contribute to the MTBoS (Math Twitter Blogosphere) community.

Over the past year I have participated more in conversations with people on Twitter.  I so wished I had done that prior to TMC last year so that I could meet all of these people who were helping me out so much in person.  So needless to say I could not wait to meet everyone in person at TMC this year.

One night several of us when to The Varsity, which claims to be the world’s largest drive in.  It was one of my highlights of the week.

There were several of us from Minnesota that made the trip to Atlanta!

And a few last pictures.

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